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Angelo Gentile from Italy took this Saturn picture with a telescope Celestron C11 and a DFK21 camera. It is visible the Cassini division in spite of the rings been near edge-on. The effective resolution of this image is around 0.5 arcseconds.
 
2017-05-01 00:26:33       
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2015-11-13 12:39:00       
It is an amazing subcejt of immense beauty. I share your fascination. Would it be so strange that we were not old souls but those connected to a infinite existence that could not be exposed?
 
2015-10-18 16:21:50       
Thank you, Mrs. Geigner. Oh, and I figured out why all those ppeloe were standing up when they gave their answers in algebra. I recognized it right away. Just try and guess how I know what this is. You will probably find out anyways.
 
2012-10-22 22:57:55       
"Good to see a tealnt at work. I can't match that."

Are you being despising? If so, shut up, you jealous idiot.

 
2012-10-07 08:45:49       
Okay, having no rep to pcroett, I'll take a stab.It's generally thought that rings are normal but relatively short-lived phenomena (in age-of-the-universe terms.) Earth is likely to have had one in the distant past, but it didn't survive the advent of the Moon, however that came to pass. Mars may develop a ring if its nearer moon breaks up in 50 Million or so years.Apparently, shepherd moons help to stabilize rings over longer time spans, so the moon system around Saturn in particular is helping maintain the ring in a more or less stable form. (In fact two of the moons may be contributing material to the ring system, because they're inside Saturn's Roche Limit, and are therefore [likely] gradually falling apart.)So as to why it seems only gas giants have them (in our local system of course) I think it's just a coincidence of timing. If you'd been around to stare at the solar system several hundred million years ago (or maybe a few billion) you'd have seen a different situation.
 
2011-08-19 05:39:21       
Good to see a tealnt at work. I can't match that.
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